History Blog 

Long-time speaker of the house left lasting imprint on Hannibal

Noted Hannibal attorney and lawmaker Roy Hamlin, right, poses with Harry S Truman at the Democratic National Convention in 1948 in Philadelphia, Pa. Photo contributed by Linda Steinbeck. MARY LOU MONTGOMERY At the beginning of the 20th Century, Dr. Mont. M. Hamlin was a St. Louis physician held in high regard by his colleagues. In 1902, he was appointed by the Missouri governor to fill a vacancy on the State Board of Health. At the time, he was serving as the well-known editor of the American Medical Journal, and was a dean and professor of Materia Medica for the American Medical College of St. Louis. It was in his capacity as editor of the medical journal that Dr. Hamlin found himself in a

Fruit dealer considered ‘miracle worker’; provided healing to many 1915-16

The John Fusco home still stands at 116 S. Seventh St., in the Central Park Historic District. The home remained in Fusco’s family for a half century, providing housing for three generations of the fruit vendor’s family. MARY LOU MONTGOMERY MARY LOU MONTGOMERY Fifty-eight-year-old Ralls County, Mo., native Susan Tutt Holdsworth was hopelessly suffering from inflammatory rheumatism in the spring of 1915, when a glimmer of hope appeared upon the horizon. Living in Paris, Mo., and married to broom-maker James P. Holdsworth, she learned of a miracle worker from Hannibal, Mo.: a fruit salesman by the name of John Fusco. She had been suffering from rheumatism for six years, and could barely walk a

Visionary John S. Mainland laid the groundwork for early baseball expansion

This photo, taken circa 1910, shows the streetcar barn of the old Hannibal Electric Railway, on Market Street. The building, which has now been replaced by a newer building, was used much later by the Hannibal Quincy Truck Lines. The house atop the bluff belonged to Sinclair Mainland, owner of the Hannibal Electric Railway. This photo was taken by Anna Schnitzlein and is from Steve Chou’s photo collection. It is featured in “Hannibal Missouri Bluff City Memories” by Steve Chou. MARY LOU MONTGOMERY John S. Mainland, among Hannibal’s wealthy citizens in 1909, was keenly aware of the problems associated with Central Division baseball. As manager of the Hannibal Street Railway Co., he had made a

Hannibal Cannibal’s short-lived role as a minor league franchise

This photo, taken circa 1910, shows the streetcar barn of the old Hannibal Electric Railway, on Market Street. The building, which has now been replaced by a newer building, was used much later by the Hannibal Quincy Truck Lines. The house atop the bluff belonged to Sinclair Mainland, owner of the Hannibal Electric Railway. This photo was taken by Anna Schnitzlein and is from Steve Chou’s photo collection. It is featured in “Hannibal Missouri Bluff City Memories” by Steve Chou. MARY LOU MONTGOMERY The Cubs are coming! The Cubs are coming! That might have been the rally cry for baseball enthusiasts in Hannibal and beyond during the spring of 1909. The Chicago Cubs, winners of the 1908 World S

Family operation - For 25 years, Smith family provided milk to Hannibal

Reprinted from the Jan. 11, 2014 edition of the Hannibal Courier-Post Mary Margaret Smith had the good fortune to be able to revisit the home on West Ely Road in Hannibal, where she grew up. Photo contributed by Peggy McNeal Hoyt. MARY LOU MONTGOMERY The shoe factory whistle bellowed throughout the town, sounding out - for all to hear - the beginnings and endings of shifts for hundreds of Hannibal workers. When that whistle blared, Mary Margaret Smith, who was a Hannibal teenager in the 1940s, knew she'd better prepare for the swelling of workers who'd walk the few blocks during their break to the Quality Dairy - located on Lyon Street - which was owned by her father, John W. Smith. She s

‘Coal miner southpaw’ led Hannibal to victory

David Kraft is pictured while a pitcher for the Hannibal Cannibal baseball team, circa 1909. Photo posted on Ancestry.com’s public files by Michelle McDaniel. Lola Wolf Kraft and David D. Kraft. Posted on public files, Ancestry.com. HCP DAVE CRAFT In 1918, Dave D. Kraft was working for a coal company in Richmond Mo. Married to Lola Wolf Kraft, 36-year-old David had returned to his hometown of Henrietta, Mo., near Kansas City, and resumed a career he had started earlier in his life – that of a coal miner. The tall, brown-eyed son of Missouri was settled down now, married, and the pursuit of his youthful ambition of playing professional baseball was but a faded memory. But to a bevvy of loyal

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